Power Plant Jobs About Us  |  Work for Us  |  Help
Power Plant Jobs
Engineering Jobs


Power Plant Jobs Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Get candidates to fill your engineering and/or technical jobs within 24-48 hours!
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Home > Resources > 
More Job Search Options
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Power Plant Jobs Advanced Search
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Power Plant Jobs New Jobs
Last 10 Days
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Power Plant Jobs Search by Industry
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Hot Engineering Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Jobs sorted by number
Power Plant Jobs Job Alerts
  Salary Survey Types
  Jobs by World Map
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Other Job Types
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Resources
Energy Jobs
Resume writing help
Energy Jobs
Salary Surveys 
Energy Jobs
Take Salary Survey 
Energy Jobs
Salary Trends by Title
Energy Jobs
Opinion Polls 
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Free Resume Help for Engineering Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Resume writing tips
Power Plant Jobs Engineering
Power Plant Jobs Resume examples
Power Plant Jobs Sample resumes
Power Plant Jobs Resume templates
Power Plant Jobs Resume format
Power Plant Jobs Resume cover letter
Power Plant Jobs Samples for engineers
Power Plant Jobs Learn how to write a resume!
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Paid Resume Services for Engineering Careers
Power Plant Jobs Resume services for engineers
Power Plant Jobs Resume writing services
Power Plant Jobs Resume builder services
Power Plant Jobs Resume posting services
Power Plant Jobs Resume cover letter tips
Power Plant Jobs Resume writing tips
Power Plant Jobs Job Search tips
Power Plant Jobs Executive Resume
Power Plant Jobs Technical Resume
Power Plant Jobs Sales Resume
Power Plant Jobs Marketing Resume
Power Plant Jobs Entry-Level Resume
Power Plant Jobs Jobs via RSS
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Power Plant Jobs
Search 2000 + Worldwide Engineering Jobs and Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Example: job number, keyword, etc.
  State      
Power Plant Jobs Power Plant Jobs Power Plant Jobs

Resources:

  


How to Survive the 30-Second Glance


Most job seekers have heard that resumes often get only a “30-second glance” once in the hands of the recruiter, human resource professional, or hiring manager. Passing the HR screening is more difficult because their job is to screen applicants out. The hiring manager is more likely to give your resume more than a “30-second glance,” but you have to pass the screening, which is generally, a very brief look at what you have to offer. Recruiters are somewhere in the middle. The question is: “How do you prepare a resume that grabs attention in a matter of seconds? The following tips will help you get started.

A resume is a job seeker’s “calling card.” Many are carefully prepared; some applicants create their own while others use a resume writing service. Each job seeker is hoping to survive the “cut” and be one of a handful of people selected for an interview. It’s no secret that resumes should be typed and free of spelling and grammatical errors. Applicants decide what goes on their resumes and they should always include their best credentials. Information on a resume includes a job objective, work experience and educational background. Some “old fashioned” resumes still include personal information such as marital status, date of birth, height, weight, etc. Personal information can be used to screen you out so never put it on your resume.
In reviewing resumes the screener will be looking for clues to the applicant by considering the following:
Is your resume organized in a manner that is understandable and easy to read or is it a mass of confusion with statements that have little relevancy? Does the overall appearance give the reader the impression that you have taken great care in preparing it? The manner in which your resume is organized reflects your ability to communicate effectively. In thirty seconds it should be apparent that you are a well-organized communicator who can quickly contribute to the success of the company.
Have you included a job objective, if so, is it specific or general? Applicants who know what they want and are focused in their job search efforts will have a very clear job objective. That immediately tells the screener that the applicant is not applying for every job that comes along, but is being selective and knows what he or she wants.
Does the format of your resume do a good job of getting the applicant’s message across? Is the resume in a chronological or functional format or a combination of the two? If it’s a functional resume do you give the impression that you are trying to hide something? Functional formats provide a good cover for gaps in work history and lack of specific experience among other things. Screeners are tuned-in to this strategy and may automatically eliminate you because of it.
Does your resume include accomplishment statements or is it just a job description? Does it indicate that you are budget conscious, profit-minded and successful in reducing costs? The more achievements in a resume, the more the screener will want to read beyond thirty seconds.
Is your resume more than two pages? The reader might assume that if an applicant has a long resume, that he might also be long-winded during the interview as well as on the job. Provide only enough information to whet the reader’s appetite and desire to learn more about you in person. Screeners do not want to read your biography, but they do expect substance in a full-bodied one or two page resume. If your resume is two pages, it should cover at least of the second page to avoid appearing as though you ran out of something to say.
Is your resume short on information? If you have one skimpy page and you are a recent college graduate, or one to two skimpy pages for a job seeker with five or more years of experience, the reader will not spend more than thirty seconds reviewing it.

Evidence of writing ability can often be seen in a well-written resume. Is your resume written in the proper tense without spelling and grammatical errors and with no dangling participles, or is it an English teacher’s nightmare? If you are not good at writing, there is no shame in getting someone to help you or at the very least proof read what you have written.

Sloppiness and inconsistencies can be attributed to the applicant, as each of these things will be considered when evaluating you. If you are in a hurry and don’t put the time and effort into every resume you send out, you are defeating the purpose if your resume isn’t “letter perfect.”

What type of education do you have listed? Have you included continuing education as well as formal education and is it relevant to the position to which you are applying? Never include information regarding high school graduation as most people have at least that much education. However, college degrees or even credit hours toward a degree should be on your resume, as should applicable post-graduate education including continuing education in your field of expertise.

How precise is your information? Does it tell the readers exactly what they want to know or does it leave them guessing? More is not necessarily better. What you choose to share should be precisely what they want to see without a hint of rambling or suggestion that the job seeker doesn’t know what he or she is looking for or has to offer in relationship to the job requirements.

A customized resume will stand out. You will use “key words” to grab the readers’ attention even during a thirty-second glance. Job seekers who don’t customize are at a big disadvantage. Every resume that leaves your hands should be specifically written for the job to which you are applying.

Is your work experience evident? Is it written in a way that showcases your specific accomplishments? If not, you will be hard-pressed to get more than a thirty-second glance. If you have done your homework in preparing your resume, what you have to offer prospective employers will immediately be evident.

Have you included other activities or special interests on your resume? Are they relevant to the job to which you are applying? You could be wasting the screener’s time with fluff that has nothing to do with the job for which they are screening resumes. For example, if your hobby is building computers or designing web sites and the job to which you are applying is for a software engineer, include your hobby.

Does your resume have a marketing quality? Will it make the screener want to pick up the phone and call you for a telephone interview? This is the overall impression that your resume gives the reader from the second he or she picks it up to read it. If it doesn’t have “marketing quality,” you can forget an invitation for a face-to-face interview.

In conclusion, surviving the 30-second glance is something every job seeker must prepare for before sending out resumes. Hiring managers and/or the people who screen resumes don’t have time to waste. A quick look will immediately tell them if they want to read further. You need to do a good job of selling yourself to the prospective new employer. If you don’t your resume will end up in the circular file and you will never know why. To avoid this sad story, take steps now to make sure that your resume survives the 30-second glance.

Visit our Network of related Engineering and Power Plant Job Sites:
ThinkJobs.com, ThinkJobs, Thinc, Technical Jobs Fast, Technical Staffing Fast and ThinkEnergyGroup
are registered trademark's ® of Think Resources, Inc.
Copyright ® 2008 Think Resources, Inc.

Vedior N.V. - Search for jobs and corporate information.
 

DCSIMG
DCSIMG