Power Plant Jobs About Us  |  Work for Us  |  Help
Power Plant Jobs
Engineering Jobs


Power Plant Jobs Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Get candidates to fill your engineering and/or technical jobs within 24-48 hours!
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Home > Resources > 
More Job Search Options
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Power Plant Jobs Advanced Search
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Power Plant Jobs New Jobs
Last 10 Days
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Power Plant Jobs Search by Industry
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Hot Engineering Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Jobs sorted by number
Power Plant Jobs Job Alerts
  Salary Survey Types
  Jobs by World Map
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Other Job Types
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Resources
Energy Jobs
Resume writing help
Energy Jobs
Salary Surveys 
Energy Jobs
Take Salary Survey 
Energy Jobs
Salary Trends by Title
Energy Jobs
Opinion Polls 
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Free Resume Help for Engineering Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Resume writing tips
Power Plant Jobs Engineering
Power Plant Jobs Resume examples
Power Plant Jobs Sample resumes
Power Plant Jobs Resume templates
Power Plant Jobs Resume format
Power Plant Jobs Resume cover letter
Power Plant Jobs Samples for engineers
Power Plant Jobs Learn how to write a resume!
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Paid Resume Services for Engineering Careers
Power Plant Jobs Resume services for engineers
Power Plant Jobs Resume writing services
Power Plant Jobs Resume builder services
Power Plant Jobs Resume posting services
Power Plant Jobs Resume cover letter tips
Power Plant Jobs Resume writing tips
Power Plant Jobs Job Search tips
Power Plant Jobs Executive Resume
Power Plant Jobs Technical Resume
Power Plant Jobs Sales Resume
Power Plant Jobs Marketing Resume
Power Plant Jobs Entry-Level Resume
Power Plant Jobs Jobs via RSS
Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs Power Plant Jobs
Search 2000 + Worldwide Engineering Jobs and Power Plant Jobs
Power Plant Jobs
Example: job number, keyword, etc.
  State      
Power Plant Jobs Power Plant Jobs Power Plant Jobs

Resources:

  


The Secrets for Finding the Job of Your Dreams


“Dream job.” What does it really mean? For most people it means challenge, opportunity, autonomy, work-life balance, and an ethical work environment. To other people it means a great compensation package, working with people they like and having a boss that is fair and non-judgmental. What more could you ask for? It doesn’t matter. The point is that in order to get a “dream job,” you have to know what you’re looking for.

Few people have a clear vision of what their “dream job” looks like or what they expect to be doing five or ten years in the future. Sometimes people spend many years in the same job with the same organization before they decide to seek out the “job of their dreams.” People also change over time; the job that fulfilled an individual ten years ago may leave him or her feeling bored and restless today. Whether you are preparing to enter the job market for the first time, but are unsure about what kind of work you would like, or just feel it’s time to find a job that is more fulfilling, begin by asking yourself the following questions:

What can I do? For example:

What special skills and knowledge do I use to perform my job duties?
What special skills do I have that I do not currently use?
In what area(s) would I like more training?
What will it take to make that happen?
How much time will I need to invest in the training I want—Weeks? Months? Years?
Is my supervisor supportive of me and the things I have proven that I can do well?

What do I want to do? For example:

What do I want to do more of in my next job?
What did/do I like most about my previous/current job?
Would I prefer working alone or as part of a team?
How much travel and time away from home is too much?
Do I want to be in a position of authority, or would I be happy as a follower?
How important are advancement opportunities?
If I could have any job at all, what would I choose?
What keeps me motivated?
What do you want to do with the rest of your life?
Are you more focused on finding a “dream job” or pursuing a satisfying lifestyle?

These questions are the tip of the iceberg. Every individual has a wide array of abilities and talents. Each person has several career and/or job possibilities in which they could excel, all of which may be equally satisfying. Different jobs present different degrees of challenge, as do different careers. Today we have five times the job diversification that we had only ten years ago. We can expect this variety to continue expanding. So if you are intent in finding your “dream job,” you have work to do. It’s also possible that you want and need more than a “dream job.” You may benefit from a new career within or outside of the field of engineering. Other people have made major leaps of faith into new jobs and careers; you can too if you want it badly enough.

In considering your “dream job,” just because you think you would like a particular job or career doesn’t mean that you can make a living doing it. Keep in mind that interests and aptitudes are not the same. What you would like to do and what you have the skills to do could be two entirely different things. For example, an interest may motivate you to want to become a professional tennis player. However, your interest may not be enough to compensate for deficiencies in ability or lack of aptitude for the game. Also, being good at something does not always mean you will enjoy it as a job. Having an interest and aptitude for mathematics, for example, does not mean that you would enjoy being a high school math teacher or research scientist.

Another consideration is how happy you will be with your “dream job” if you do not earn what you’ve made in the past or do not earn enough to cover your expenses. If you have a true interest in a “dream job” that offers primarily lower pay than you are accustomed to, are you willing to adjust your standard of living to match your income? Some people feel that job satisfaction compensates for lower pay; others do not. You will also want to evaluate opportunities in your field. Evaluate the supply of labor versus demand for employees with particular skills. Will it be easy or difficult to get a job in your chosen field? Make your decisions based upon the challenges you may face.

A very important consideration in the personality department is whether you are an extrovert or introvert. Extroverts want people around them; they get their energy from interacting with people. They often think out loud as they work toward solutions. Introverts derive most of their energy from their minds. They think things through silently. They would just as soon work alone as with others. They often get tired when too many people are around them. Neither personality type is right or wrong. Most of us can act either way at times.

When it comes to work, each individual prefers a particular method of operating. You need to be aware of your preference when seeking a “dream job.” For example, an introvert might do well in research, but would do very poorly as a sales engineer. An extrovert, who was highly successful at leading a fund raising campaign, making speeches and meeting people, would likely be very unhappy spending the day in an office analyzing traffic flow data.

Millions of job vacancies are created every day because new jobs are created every day. Opportunities abound. As you search for your “dream job,” keep in mind that you will want to consider a variety of things before making a change. It’s important to base your decision on interests, values, skills and personality traits. Avoid pursuing a “dream job” based upon only one or two criterion. What we are really talking about here is how to get organized for new successes. You can do it!

In conclusion, finding your “dream job” means embarking on an exciting challenge that can lead to a myriad of opportunities, but it will take planning and introspection. Don’t jump into something without the confidence that you will be successful. As you know, the grass often seems greener on the other side. A job or career change is a serious decision. What’s right for someone else may not be right for you. Carefully evaluate your reasons for change. Consider asking family members and close friends for their opinions, but only if you want them to tell you the truth. You may also want to consult a professional career counselor before making your final decision. Leaving your current job for your “dream job” will not guarantee happiness.“Dream job.” What does it really mean? For most people it means challenge, opportunity, autonomy, work-life balance, and an ethical work environment. To other people it means a great compensation package, working with people they like and having a boss that is fair and non-judgmental. What more could you ask for? It doesn’t matter. The point is that in order to get a “dream job,” you have to know what you’re looking for.

Few people have a clear vision of what their “dream job” looks like or what they expect to be doing five or ten years in the future. Sometimes people spend many years in the same job with the same organization before they decide to seek out the “job of their dreams.” People also change over time; the job that fulfilled an individual ten years ago may leave him or her feeling bored and restless today. Whether you are preparing to enter the job market for the first time, but are unsure about what kind of work you would like, or just feel it’s time to find a job that is more fulfilling, begin by asking yourself the following questions:

What can I do? For example:

What special skills and knowledge do I use to perform my job duties?
What special skills do I have that I do not currently use?
In what area(s) would I like more training?
What will it take to make that happen?
How much time will I need to invest in the training I want—Weeks? Months? Years?
Is my supervisor supportive of me and the things I have proven that I can do well?

What do I want to do? For example:

What do I want to do more of in my next job?
What did/do I like most about my previous/current job?
Would I prefer working alone or as part of a team?
How much travel and time away from home is too much?
Do I want to be in a position of authority, or would I be happy as a follower?
How important are advancement opportunities?
If I could have any job at all, what would I choose?
What keeps me motivated?
What do you want to do with the rest of your life?
Are you more focused on finding a “dream job” or pursuing a satisfying lifestyle?

These questions are the tip of the iceberg. Every individual has a wide array of abilities and talents. Each person has several career and/or job possibilities in which they could excel, all of which may be equally satisfying. Different jobs present different degrees of challenge, as do different careers. Today we have five times the job diversification that we had only ten years ago. We can expect this variety to continue expanding. So if you are intent in finding your “dream job,” you have work to do. It’s also possible that you want and need more than a “dream job.” You may benefit from a new career within or outside of the field of engineering. Other people have made major leaps of faith into new jobs and careers; you can too if you want it badly enough.

In considering your “dream job,” just because you think you would like a particular job or career doesn’t mean that you can make a living doing it. Keep in mind that interests and aptitudes are not the same. What you would like to do and what you have the skills to do could be two entirely different things. For example, an interest may motivate you to want to become a professional tennis player. However, your interest may not be enough to compensate for deficiencies in ability or lack of aptitude for the game. Also, being good at something does not always mean you will enjoy it as a job. Having an interest and aptitude for mathematics, for example, does not mean that you would enjoy being a high school math teacher or research scientist.

Another consideration is how happy you will be with your “dream job” if you do not earn what you’ve made in the past or do not earn enough to cover your expenses. If you have a true interest in a “dream job” that offers primarily lower pay than you are accustomed to, are you willing to adjust your standard of living to match your income? Some people feel that job satisfaction compensates for lower pay; others do not. You will also want to evaluate opportunities in your field. Evaluate the supply of labor versus demand for employees with particular skills. Will it be easy or difficult to get a job in your chosen field? Make your decisions based upon the challenges you may face.

A very important consideration in the personality department is whether you are an extrovert or introvert. Extroverts want people around them; they get their energy from interacting with people. They often think out loud as they work toward solutions. Introverts derive most of their energy from their minds. They think things through silently. They would just as soon work alone as with others. They often get tired when too many people are around them. Neither personality type is right or wrong. Most of us can act either way at times.

When it comes to work, each individual prefers a particular method of operating. You need to be aware of your preference when seeking a “dream job.” For example, an introvert might do well in research, but would do very poorly as a sales engineer. An extrovert, who was highly successful at leading a fund raising campaign, making speeches and meeting people, would likely be very unhappy spending the day in an office analyzing traffic flow data.

Millions of job vacancies are created every day because new jobs are created every day. Opportunities abound. As you search for your “dream job,” keep in mind that you will want to consider a variety of things before making a change. It’s important to base your decision on interests, values, skills and personality traits. Avoid pursuing a “dream job” based upon only one or two criterion. What we are really talking about here is how to get organized for new successes. You can do it!

In conclusion, finding your “dream job” means embarking on an exciting challenge that can lead to a myriad of opportunities, but it will take planning and introspection. Don’t jump into something without the confidence that you will be successful. As you know, the grass often seems greener on the other side. A job or career change is a serious decision. What’s right for someone else may not be right for you. Carefully evaluate your reasons for change. Consider asking family members and close friends for their opinions, but only if you want them to tell you the truth. You may also want to consult a professional career counselor before making your final decision. Leaving your current job for your “dream job” will not guarantee happiness.

Visit our Network of related Engineering and Power Plant Job Sites:
ThinkJobs.com, ThinkJobs, Thinc, Technical Jobs Fast, Technical Staffing Fast and ThinkEnergyGroup
are registered trademark's ® of Think Resources, Inc.
Copyright ® 2008 Think Resources, Inc.

Vedior N.V. - Search for jobs and corporate information.
 

                                   

DCSIMG
                       
DCSIMG